Lung Cancer Treatment in Tampa Bay

Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology offers several of the most advanced treatment options available to lung cancer patients in Tampa, Florida. If you or a loved one has received a lung cancer diagnosis, the lung cancer specialists at Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology will deliver a superior level of care.

The goal of the physicians and Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology is to provide lung cancer patients with precise and effective treatment to attack tumors while preserving as much normal tissue as possible.

Contact Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology today for more information about lung cancer, our lung cancer specialists and lung cancer treatment options. Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology has multiple Florida facilities located in the Tampa Bay area in Tampa, Florida and Brandon, Florida.

E.R., 2022 Lung Cancer Patient

"At TBRO, the Dr and Staff were very open to conversation. What I would say overall is that TBRO has good people. And if others have lung cancer, my advice is to ask questions and make sure your family is involved."

What TBRO Lung Cancer Patients Have Said

K.A.S., 2022 Lung Cancer Patient

"I picked TBRO because it was the best alternative when I was given options. Dr. Kahn was very helpful and knowledgable and very sympathetic. Overall, I would say about TBRO that there are great people working there. And to other patients - be patient, it's a long journey."

What to Know About Lung Cancer

Lung cancer is a type of cancer that typically starts in the cells lining the bronchi and other parts of the lung. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. According to the American Cancer Society, more than 236,000 Americans will be diagnosed with lung cancer this year, and contrary to perceptions, lung cancer affects more than smokers and former smokers. Virtually anyone can get lung cancer, whether they smoke or not, although smoking greatly increases the chance of getting lung cancer. Tragically, only about 24% of lung cancer cases are diagnosed at an early stage when the survival rate is much higher.

Lung cancer occurs mainly in older people. The average age for lung cancer detection is 70, and a very small number of people diagnosed are under 45. The chance that a man will develop lung cancer in his lifetime is about 1 in 15. For a woman, the chance is about 1 in 17. These numbers include those who smoke, but for both groups the risk is much higher if they smoke or did smoke.

What are the Two Main Types of Lung Cancer?

Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC)

Non-small cell lung cancer accounts for over 80% of all lung cancers. There are subtypes of NSCLC, which start from different types of lung cells but are grouped together because their prognoses and treatment are similar.

NCLC subtypes include:

  • Adenocarcinoma
  • Squamous cell carcinoma
  • Large cell (undifferentiated) carcinoma

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC)

Small cell lung cancer accounts for almost 15% of all lung cancers. SCLC
typically grows and spreads faster than NSCLC, and it is usually not diagnosed until it has already spread. SCLC responds well to chemotherapy and radiation therapy but has a high instance of reoccurrence. Other types of tumors can occur in the lungs as well.

Screening for Lung Cancer

Lung cancer screening is key to early detection of the disease, but according to the American Lung Association’s 2022 Lung Health Barometer, “73% of adults have not spoken with their doctor about their risk for lung cancer, and only 40% are concerned they might get the disease.” Screening involves a quick, low-level CT scan, but of the 14 million Americans who qualify as high risk for lung cancer, only 5% are screened before they experience symptoms.

Despite its serious prognosis, earlier-stage lung cancer can be treated and sometimes cured. The number of newly diagnosed cases of lung cancer as well as the number of deaths from lung cancer continue to decrease, thanks to advances in early detection and treatment along with less people smoking.

Risk Factors for Lung Cancer

Smoking

Smoking (cigarettes, cigars, or pipes) is by far the leading risk factor for lung cancer. Roughly 80% of lung cancer deaths are thought to be caused by smoking, and it’s very rare for someone who has never smoked to have SCLC.

Secondhand smoke

Secondhand smoke is thought to cause more than 7,000 deaths from lung cancer each year.

Radon exposure

Radon is the second leading cause of lung cancer in the U.S. and the leading cause among people who don’t smoke.

Asbestos exposure

Lung cancer or mesothelioma risk is much greater in workers exposed to asbestos who also smoke.

Exposure to cancer-causing agents in the workplace

Other cancer-causing agents found in some workplaces can increase lung cancer risk, including radioactive agents, inhaled chemicals, and diesel exhaust.

Taking certain dietary supplements

Studies have found that people who smoked and took beta carotene supplements have an increased risk for lung cancer.

Air pollution

Worldwide it is estimated that about 5% of all deaths from lung cancer are caused by outdoor air pollution.

Personal or family history of lung cancer

Researchers have found that genetics seems to play a role in some families with a strong history of lung cancer, and if you have had lung cancer, you have a higher risk of recurrence.

Symptoms of Lung Cancer

Unfortunately, symptoms of lung cancer don’t usually present until the disease is in an advanced stage, which is why early screening and detection is critical.
Once lung cancer is present, symptoms may show up as being related to the lungs or may show up as being related to other parts of the body, indicating that the cancer has metastasized.

General symptoms of lung cancer include:

  • A chronic cough that won’t go away
  • Chest pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Wheezing
  • Coughing up blood
  • Tiredness
  • Unexplained weight loss

Repeatedly contracting pneumonia and swollen lymph nodes may also indicate the presence of lung cancer.

Treatment Approaches for Lung Cancer

Treatment plans for lung cancer vary widely based on its stage, the specific traits of the cancer, the patient’s overall health and lung function. Treatment for both Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) and Small-Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) generally involve a combination of the following, depending on the stage:

  • Surgery
  • Radiofrequency Ablation (RFA)
  • Radiation Therapy
  • Chemotherapy
  • Targeted Drug Therapy
  • Palliative Procedures

Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer at TBRO

Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology offers several of the most advanced treatment options available to lung cancer patients in Tampa, Florida, including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy, Image Guided Radiation Therapy, and CyberKnife Radiosurgery. If you or a loved one has received a lung cancer diagnosis, the lung cancer specialists at Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology will deliver a superior level of care.

The goal of the physicians and staff at Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology is to provide lung cancer patients with precise and effective treatment to attack tumors while preserving as much normal tissue as possible.

Contact Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology today for more information about lung cancer screening, our lung cancer specialists, and your lung cancer treatment options. Tampa Bay Radiation Oncology has multiple Florida facilities located in the Tampa Bay area in Tampa and Brandon.